It was 2014 and we were new to all this. To cut a long and frustrating story short, we realised that in spite of notifying all the usual agencies about the situation, we were going to have to sort this out ourselves. Fortunately with the support of the Police, and after a lot of phone calls we were able to identify a suitable long-term home for him, and - at least as important - they could  offer proper horse transport to get him there! Without their help to get him away to safety he would have died.

 

So Mowgli was loaded, and left for his new home. On arrival he was so weak he struggled to walk, so it was one steady step at a time on his overgrown feet to reach his stable. He was riddled with lice and worms, and the vet warned that  the little boy might not survive the night. For many days after, his recovery was far from certain with several scares and quite a few tears for his struggle. 

 

Slowly, he began to grow in strength, managing to balance and pricking his ears up at his new human friends. The sadness in his eyes began to show a slight twinkle. Weeks on, there were more tears - this time of joy - when he chose to trot on his own. He joined an old pony who became both friend and father figure to Mowgli.

 

Mowgli today is still with his family. He’s now a sweet-natured ridden pony and much loved, a credit to their care and commitment. He looks great, he clearly loves competing and jumping!

 

When we re-homed Mowgli we were new to the realities of equine rescue, but this experience  taught us important lessons. It made us realise that there are gaps in the welfare provision for animals, and for equines in particular. UK law regards equines as 'companion animals' akin to cats and dogs, even though their size and needs bear little or no comparison. 

 

We learned also that we should look to our own contacts and resources if we want to deliver effective help to animals. There's a network of wonderful caring people out there.

A little lost soul...

Mowgli's story.

Susie

We first noticed the shivering colt in the company of a stallion who had been fly-grazed for some time. Where he’d come from, who can tell - but the new arrival was clearly not welcome in the field.

The grazing was poor; the stallion hungry and anxious. The little colt was discovered hiding, scared and alone, in a bramble patch trying to keep out of sight. His eyes looked so downcast and sad.

We first noticed the shivering colt in the company of a stallion who had been fly-grazed for some time. Where he’d come from, who can tell - but the new arrival was clearly not welcome in the field. The grazing was poor; the stallion hungry and anxious. The little colt was discovered hiding, scared and alone, in a bramble patch trying to keep out of sight. His eyes looked so downcast and sad.

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